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THE FORGOTTEN WARS is an account of the era from about 1818 to 1845 when the effects of the musket impacted in devastating form throughout Aotearoa. Every part of the country was affected at some time or other by powerful, wide-ranging musket- armed taua (war parties). In addition to the heavy casualties inflicted by the musket, widespread temporary and permanent migrations and depopulation occurred.

‘With the arrival of muskets en masse, suddenly one side had unstoppable power.The possession of that power enabled taua to be far more wide-reaching, and far moredevastating in their impacts.’

The Forgotten Wars is an engaging account of New Zealand history. Drawing on his seminal The Musket Wars, this concise work breaks the wars down by region and tribe, with stunningly detailed maps and illustrations that will help to ensure these epochal conflicts are no longer forgotten.  This book has been written not only as a Teaching Resource for use in schools, but as an account of  New Zealands history to be enjoyed by all.

REVIEWS OF OTHER RON CROSBY TITLES

'The Musket Wars must rate as one of the most accessible and well presented treatments of New Zealand history currently available.' Sir Tipene O'Regan, Dominion

'One of the must-reads of 1999.' Iain Sharp, Sunday Star-Times

''A necessary addition to all collections of New Zealand history.' Diana Masters, Waikato Daily Times

''Crosby's book is both intriguing and absorbing to the point of brilliance and gives new insights into both the ability of the Maori to adapt quickly and their impressive skills of innovation.' Jim Hunter, The Southland Times

''It represents an important compilation of material about a crucial period of New Zealand history which is often overlooked, yet which is of huge importance to Treaty of Waitangi claims.' Jim Eagles, Hawke's Bay Today

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Andris Apse

One of New Zealand’s leading landscape photographers Andris Apse came to New Zealand as a child as a Latvian refugee together with his mother Kamilla who believed his father Voldemars had been killed in the war. 46 years later after Latvia gained its freedom from Russian occupation in 1990 it was found that Voldemars was still alive in Latvia. Through diaries and correspondence retained by Kamilla and translated by her and other Latvians in New Zealand decades later the book recounts the family’

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